Book Reviews

Family Wisdom by Robin Sharma – #AtoZChallenge Day 23

posted by Anupriya 6 Comments

Book Blurb – Family Wisdom From The Monk Who Sold hid Ferrari by Robin Sharma

Robin Sharma reveals an easy yet strikingly effective system that shows you how to awaken the natural leadership potential of your child while restoring your own balance, joy and inner peace in the process. This book follows the continuing adventures of Julian Mantle, a high-powered legal superstar turned enlightened monk, who imparts the wisest answers to life’s deepest questions. Within these pages, you’ll discover how to: unlock the best and highest talents of your child; deepen the relationships with those you love; create a family culture that is rich, enduring and beautiful; connect with your destiny and live your heart’s desires and more.

Book Review – Family Wisdom From The Monk Who Sold hid Ferrari by Robin Sharma

For some reason (one that I have no clue about) I have not read ‘The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari’. Probably because the book came at a time when I abstained from reading any kind of self-help books. It is only once I have become a parent (an impatient one at that) that I have resorted to self help parenting books to find my sanity. And thus in my quest, I came across the book, Family Wisdom by Robin Sharma.

This story is about a mid-aged lady who has had a successful career and is currently riding high on the success of her own start-up.  But amidst all the professional success she like many others in the same rut, loses touch with her family, especially her kids. This is the story of how a near death experience brings her face to face with the fact that life is beyond one’s work space and where one can find true happiness.

This journey of finding happiness in discovering the true value of relationships stands on five pillars, called ‘The 5 Masteries of the Family Leader’.  These principles are based on the premise of drawing analogies between an organization and a family (or rather a household). The ultimate aim is to nurture the children in the family so that they become capable of living life without inhibitions and find their independent definition of success.

This book, seemingly a sequel to ‘The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari’ is a conversation between a sister (the protagonist) and her brother (the monk) and how the latter helps the former find true happiness by taking it easy on her professional front and focusing on spending quality time with her family.

The entire narrative is full of relatable events and concerns and thus touches the right cords with the reader. In the fast life that we are subject to today, this book comes as a reminder of the well known adage that ‘When you die, your bosses will find a replacement for you, but your family may never be able to fill in the void left by you’

P.S. – Work Life balance as an endemic has been discussed for over a decade now. But Family Wisdom From The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari gives you a direction as to how one can achieve work life balance without ignoring one’s career.

Family Wisdom

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6 Comments

Noor Anand Chawla April 26, 2019 at 11:52 am

I also have never read The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, but have always heard rave reviews. This one sounds good too. I’m curious to know, of all the books you’ve read for this series, which is the one stand-out book? Or should I ask that on the last day?!

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vidhya Thakkar April 26, 2019 at 3:43 pm

another wonderful review! loved it

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Abhijit April 26, 2019 at 6:18 pm

Nice book. I guess one has to balance between work and family. Unfortunately, we forget our family in the mad rush to nurture our career.

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Vartika Gakhar April 26, 2019 at 7:26 pm

Havent read any of his work, though heard a lot about “The Monk who sold his Ferrari”. Interesting review Anupriya

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kushal April 26, 2019 at 7:31 pm

Work-life balance – yes it is an important one. However I feel on a macro level, it is really not a personal issue, I find it more on the societal, organizational and cultural level…which needs relevant changes for the a more balanced and happier family life.

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Linda Stewart May 26, 2019 at 12:37 pm

I like the quote. Always good to be reminded of our mortality and where our priorities ought to be. Visiting from the #A2Z Challenge Road Trip. Linda x LIBRARY

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