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AtoZ Challenge 2019

Marzia Hassan
AtoZ Challenge 2019

Parenting In The Age Of Facebook by Marzia Hassan – #AtoZChallenge Day 6

posted by Anupriya April 6, 2019 12 Comments

Book Blurb – Parenting In The Age Of Facebook by Marzia Hassan

Parenting in the Age of Facebook acknowledges the all-pervasive influence of the World Wide Web on the lives of children, and the quandaries parents find themselves in as a result. How much ‘net-time’ is enough? Are children safe on social media pages? What are the online dangers kids could encounter and how do parents counter these threats? By encouraging practical, proactive strategies—those that model the mindful use of technology, help nurture connections, and support children through healthy Internet-browsing techniques—this book encourages positive parenting in the age of Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Book Review – Parenting In The Age Of Facebook by Marzia Hassan

How much and What! These have been the perpetual questions that the parents of the 90s kids asked themselves (and sometimes even us) with the advent of hundreds of channels on cable TV. The debate or rather the dilemma only got wider with internet becoming an integral part of our lives. And if there is one book by an Indian author, that will address all your doubts and put to rest any arguments regarding the impact of exposure media it is ‘Parenting in the Age of Facebook’ by Marzia Hassan.

The book is very thoughtfully divided into three parts –

Facing Reality – this part talks about the hard facts of the how integrally social media and other forms of media have become a significant part of our lives.

Assessing the Impact of Technology – It takes you on a fearfully detailed round up of the impact technology and social media are having on young kids and teenagers.

Steps to Thriving as a Family in the Digital Age – This section is a practical guide to steps that one can take as a parent and a family member to ensure that technology remains a significant part of our lives, but does not eat into the very value system of our existence and ruin everything.

What makes this book an intriguing read is the thorough research that the author Marzia Hassan has done to put together real life stories of how exposure to technology and social media presence are impact the psychic of kids as young as 7-8 years as well as teenagers. The impact has been analyzed in detail on fronts such as communication, relationships, self confidence, inner fears and most of all on self image (including weird insecurities and weider aspirations)

The part that discusses about how to be vigilant parents and raise protected and responsible kids is a step by step guide of do(s) and don’t(s). This portion very realistically also warns you against fronts where you as a parent are likely to slip and how to detect early signs of any influenced behavior.

I am taking this April Blogging Challenge with Blogchatter

Check all the details at the #AtoZChallenge Official Blog here.

Pooja Makhija
AtoZ Challenge 2019

Eat Delete Junior: Child Nutrition for Zero to Fifteen Years by Pooja Makhija – #AtoZChallenge Day 5

posted by Anupriya April 5, 2019 13 Comments

Book Blurb -Eat.Delete.Junior by Pooja Makhija

For parents who have a lot on their plate. Children are question marks. Bawling, cooing, spit-blowing question marks. How long should you breastfeed your baby? Will he sleep through the night? How should you start your child off on solid foods? Will she grow up into a responsible adult? While many of life’s riddles are difficult to solve, celebrity nutritionist Pooja Makhija addresses one vital question with an insight, and humour, few others have: the question of child nutrition. What you feed your children is only one aspect of nourishment; how they eat is another. Focused on the psychology of eating and keeping a child’s unique bio-individuality in mind, this sequel to Pooja’s best-selling Eat Delete sheds light on how a child’s palate develops, methods to keep junk food at bay, and the habits needed to prevent ill-health and obesity. It also teaches you that while correct eating is paramount, it’s okay to bend the rules occasionally if you keep in mind the big picture: that if you teach kids good nutritional habits when they are young, they will take nutritionally responsible decisions as adults. Woven through with fables and fairy tales, and separating the facts from family myth, Eat Delete Junior will help parents emerge victorious over the ultimate child-rearing battleground: the dinner table.

Formats Available – Paperback / Kindle

No. of Pages – 236

Book Review – Eat.Delete.Junior by Pooja Makhija

With an engaging language and refreshing sense of humour, the author covers a gamut of issues related to child nutrition. She provides her version of easily implementable solutions and not so easily achievable nutrition goals. The eventual agenda is to slowly transform our practices to ensure nutrition. Eat.Delete.Junior is almost like a reference bible for people like me who are scared of and confused by the ocean of information available online.

What I liked most about this book is that it gives you the liberty of using the best-fit practices and not always the best practices. The author also touches upon peripheral issues that impact food choices and kids behaviour in the modern times.

A lot of our frustrations and dilemmas are put in a perspective, when we are assured by a dietician and specialist of Pooja Makhija’s repute that as kids grow up their environment expands beyond their home and parents. Thus we cannot do too much to control their eating habits. And thus providing advice and work plans that are a best probable work arounds towards healthy eating practices.

P.S. – This book is a ready reference guide with very practical tips of how we as parents can induce nutrition into our kid’s diet at various life stages.  Go for it if you are also looking for some light hearted parent confessions in this regard.Pooja Makhija

I am taking this April Blogging Challenge with Blogchatter

Check all the details at the #AtoZChallenge Official Blog here.

Mahak Wadhwani
AtoZ Challenge 2019

Diary of a Baby: Candid confessions of a baby from 0 to 2 years by Mahak Wadhwani – #AtoZChallenge Day 4

posted by Anupriya April 4, 2019 11 Comments

Book Blurb -Diary Of A Baby Candid Confessions Of A Baby From 0 To 2 Years by Mahak Wadhwani

Have you ever wondered what goes on inside your baby’s mind?
Doctors, scientists and psychologists have been trying for centuries to get a sneak peak into what exactly goes on inside a baby’s brain and are no closer to revealing the truth. Well this book is here to not just give you a sneak peak, but a no-holds barred candid confession right from the horse’s…err…baby’s mouth!

“Diary of a Baby” is a candid, witty take on life from a baby’s perspective written in the form of diary entries. Each chapter follows a new stage in the baby’s life – starting to crawl, first solid meal, first day of preschool etc. Each entry is followed by an interpretation of that phase of the baby’s life with anecdotes from the author’s own parenting experiences. Continue Reading

Conversations With My Children
AtoZ Challenge 2019

Conversations With My Children by Sivaram Pusapati – #AtoZChallenge Day 3

posted by Anupriya April 3, 2019 8 Comments

Book Blurb – Conversations With My Children

This is a collection of a Meditator Father’s conversations with his Children, where he allows the Nature to speak through him.
He hopes these will conversations will help his fellow parents and teachers in molding children’s minds in a natural way, while also making parenting a joyful process. These conversations encompass a wide range of topics ranging from day to day challenges to woman-man differences to birth and death and so on. Continue Reading

Bloody Good Parenting
AtoZ Challenge 2019

13 Steps to Bloody Good Parenting by Kiran Manral and Ashwin Sanghi- #AtoZChallenge Day 2

posted by Anupriya April 2, 2019 7 Comments

Book Blurb

A WISE MAN ONCE SAID, ‘BEFORE I GOT MARRIED, I HAD SIX THEORIES ABOUT BRINGING UP CHILDREN. NOW I HAVE SIX CHILDREN AND NO THEORIES.’

In this age of hyper-information, parenting is much like tap-dancing in a minefield. There was a time when parents had nothing to draw from except for their experiences with their own parents. But today, there is information overload and conflicting advice from multiple ‘experts’.

HOW ARE PARENTS TO NAVIGATE THIS JUNGLE OF COUNSEL AND STILL RETAIN THEIR SANITY? Continue Reading

Adoption
AtoZ Challenge 2019Book Review

The Confluence A novel of family, adoption, and a mother’s love – AtoZChallenge Day 1

posted by Anupriya April 1, 2019 14 Comments

Book Blurb – The Confluence A novel of family, adoption, and a mother’s love

 

The Kite Runner meets Monsoon Wedding during revolution in the Middle East.

The story of an Indian woman adopting her son as she brings her estranged family back together in fictionalized Sudan and Calcutta.

In 2045, Naina Ranjeeva writes a letter to recount the journey that led to the adoption of her son Nikhil. Decades earlier, she stumbles upon a lead on the location of her aunt,who had disappeared when Naina was just a child. After her aunt’s disappearance, Naina’s family also completely lost contact with her beloved younger cousin, Nitu. With her aunt’s location in hand, Naina takes the first step toward locating her cousin by traveling to the Republic of East Africa to search for her aunt. Her journey eventually leads her to Calcutta where she finds her cousin Nitu and his three-year-old son Nikhil. After two decades apart, the family starts to bridge the gap caused by years of separation, within the backdrop of political turmoil and revolution in East Africa.

Formats Available – Kindle

No. of Pages – 254

Book Review – The Confluence

The word ‘adoption’ in the title of the book caught my fancy and I picked this book as the first of the 26 Parenting Books which I am going to write about throughout the month of April for #AtoZChallenge.

For the first 20% of the book, I was quite skeptical about my choice and kept wondering if this book fits my agenda. The story progresses with Naina the protagonist, deciding to go all the way to political trouble striken East Africa to look for an aunt who estranged her own son along with rest of the family when she was just a child.   As the Naina progresses, I see the various hues of emotions that the author tries to project. There is a young poised girl (an only child to her parents), who can’t let go of the thought of finding her cousin and having somebody who she could call her brother.  There is a mother, who offers no apology for abandoning her son years ago yet given an opportunity wants to get to know him better. A young man, who wants to meet his mother after years in the hope of an apology from her and at the same time joyous over the extended family he has just found out, whom he could trust his son’s well-being with. And then there is a young couple, at the cusp of starting a new forever with each other yet not shying away from taking up risks and responsibilities pertaining to their family.

The story has remained with me for various reasons. One it is a young girl on the lookout for her extended family on her own. She could be happy in her own bubble and ignore the facts accidently thrown her way. Yet she decides to persevere. Secondly, every character is fighting emotions internally, but sensitive enough in their behavior to not expect too much from the other. Third and most importantly, this is a narration of a woman for her son who she adopted decades ago. The issue of adoption within families and yet the significance of the ‘adopted’ knowing full truth about his roots have been emphasized at the core of this plot.

All in all a very emotionally charged family drama with multiple cultures in the backdrop and enough familial bonding in the forefront.

P.S. – Adoptions within families are a reality of the society we live in. I have myself come across several such adoptions and often wondered how the ‘Adopted’ might feel about his parents giving him up. This book has helped me sensitize myself towards this aspect of adoption.

Adoption

I am taking this April Blogging Challenge with Blogchatter

Check all the details about the #AtoZChallenge at the A to Z Official Blog here.

Read more Book Reviews on my Blog here

AtoZ Challenge 2019
AtoZ Challenge 2019

AtoZ Challenge 2019 – Theme Reveal

posted by Anupriya March 18, 2019 22 Comments

AtoZ Challenge 2019 is around the corner and at this juncture I am reminded of my first attempt at AtoZ Challenge in 2018 with 26 short fiction stories about Parenting and the gamut of relationships and emotions it engulfs. I had participated in the month long blogging challenge with Blogchatter and as is their proposition, I submitted the set of these stories as an ebook, which was published during the Blogchatter eBook Carnival.

As a blogger who’s been around for three years now, I have participated in numerous blogging challenges, but one can easily mark AtoZ Challeng as the Daddy of all Blogging Challenges, for no other challenge makes you test your commitment and grit as this one. But once you get the hang of it and complete it successfully once, you are bound to come back to it again the following year. AtoZ Challenge 2019…. here I come! Continue Reading